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News at Curtin

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Find out what’s on at Curtin. There are a wide range of events both on the campus and online, with something for everyone.

Our growing reliance on mobile phones, the internet and social media may be changing how our brains work and altering our ability to focus. Early research expresses concern about the impacts of screen use on our concentration and mental health, and particularly on young children. However, newer research finds that many of the early conclusions regarding the negative effects of screen time and social media may have been overstated. 

In this episode, Sarah is joined by Dr Patrick Clarke and Ms Tamsin Mahalingham. 

Dr Clarke is a lecturer, clinical psychologist and researcher in psychology. His research considers whether our interactions with our devices influence our patterns of emotion, for better and for worse.  

Ms Mahalingham is a PhD student at Curtin, where she has been examining the impact of social media use on mental health outcomes.  

They discuss, how cognitive processes are changing in response to technology, the connections between inner tension and health, and how future technologies could impact brain function.  

What attention control is and how it is measured [1:11] 

In what ways is the digital world changing our attention span and shaping our cognitive abilities [4:58] 

The connection between distractability, social media and mental health. [6:17] 

How we can rebuild our attention spans – or retrain our brains to help us focus without distraction [15:07] 

How our brains will adapt to the intense, digital demands of the future, such as VR and the Internet of Everything [19:13] 

Patrick and Tamsin’s upcoming research plans [24:33] 

To discover more episodes: http://curtin.edu/t9hfy2 

#TheFutureOf #CurtinResearch

Our growing reliance on mobile phones, the internet and social media may be changing how our brains work and altering our ability to focus. Early research expresses concern about the impacts of screen use on our concentration and mental health, and particularly on young children. However, newer research finds that many of the early conclusions regarding the negative effects of screen time and social media may have been overstated.

In this episode, Sarah is joined by Dr Patrick Clarke and Ms Tamsin Mahalingham.

Dr Clarke is a lecturer, clinical psychologist and researcher in psychology. His research considers whether our interactions with our devices influence our patterns of emotion, for better and for worse.

Ms Mahalingham is a PhD student at Curtin, where she has been examining the impact of social media use on mental health outcomes.

They discuss, how cognitive processes are changing in response to technology, the connections between inner tension and health, and how future technologies could impact brain function.

What attention control is and how it is measured [1:11]

In what ways is the digital world changing our attention span and shaping our cognitive abilities [4:58]

The connection between distractability, social media and mental health. [6:17]

How we can rebuild our attention spans – or retrain our brains to help us focus without distraction [15:07]

How our brains will adapt to the intense, digital demands of the future, such as VR and the Internet of Everything [19:13]

Patrick and Tamsin’s upcoming research plans [24:33]

To discover more episodes: http://curtin.edu/t9hfy2

#TheFutureOf #CurtinResearch

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YouTube Video VVVoQkxoU0h5d3RUNHRDYndEZHd1YkZBLjZyX0J3NUN3X2E4

The Future Of: Screen Time and Our Attention Spans [FULL PODCAST EPISODE]

Curtin University 10/01/2023 11:00

Green Hydrogen (Re Release) | Prof Craig Buckley

The Future Of, Ep 99 | 25:6

Is green hydrogen the key to a carbon-free energy future?

Screen time and our attention span | Dr Patrick Clarke, Tamsin Mahalingham

The Future Of, Ep 98 | 29:48

Technology and devices, and their daily influx of images and messages, may be changing the way our brains work and altering our ability to focus on set tasks.

Prisons | Dr Stuart Kinner

The Future Of, Ep 97 | 35:33

“People are sent to prison as punishment, not for punishment.” The appalling treatment of children at Banksia Hill Youth Detention Centre urges us to rethink how we treat some of society’s most vulnerable people.

Synthetic Milk | Professor Dora Marinova

The Future Of, Ep 96 | 28:28

Would you drink milk that came from a laboratory instead of a cow? Synthetic milk is set to hit supermarket shelves near you.

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